Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

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Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2015
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Assets Held for Sale
Assets Held for Sale
The Company generally considers assets to be held for sale (i) when the transaction has been approved by the board of directors or management vested with authority to approve the transaction, (ii) the assets are available for immediate sale in their present condition, (iii) the Company has initiated an active program to locate a buyer and other actions required to complete the plan to sell the assets, (iv) consummation of the transaction is probable, (v) the assets are being actively marketed for sale at a price that is reasonable in relation to their current fair value, and (vi) the transaction is expected to qualify for recognition as a completed sale, within one year. Following the classification of property and equipment as held for sale, the Company discontinues depreciating the asset and writes down the asset to the lower of carrying value or fair market value, if needed. As described in Note 14, on May 4, 2015, actions taken by the Company's board of directors caused the Company to meet the relevant criteria for reporting the Services Business as held for sale.
Concentration of Credit Risk
Concentration of Credit Risk
Financial instruments, which potentially expose the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist principally of cash on deposit with a bank, which exceeds the FDIC insurance limits, as well as accounts receivable and unbilled services. Ongoing credit evaluations of the bank and customers' financial condition and independent ratings are reviewed by the Company. Collateralization of deposits has not been required.
Deferred Offering Costs
Deferred Offering Costs
Deferred offering costs are expenses directly related to the IPO or the April 2015 Offering. These costs consist of legal, accounting, printing, and filing fees that the Company has capitalized, including fees incurred by the independent registered public accounting firm directly related to the offerings. The IPO deferred offering costs were offset against the IPO proceeds in May 2014 and were reclassified to additional paid-in capital upon completion of the IPO. Deferred costs associated with the April 2015 Offering were offset against the proceeds from the April 2015 Offering and were reclassified to additional paid-in capital upon completion of the April 2015 Offering.
Revenue Recognition and Deferred Revenue
Revenue Recognition and Deferred Revenue
The Company historically derived the majority of its revenue from providing contract research and development services under fee for service arrangements, which were provided by the Company's Services Business that was sold in July 2015 (see Notes 1 and 15). The Company also has entered into collaboration arrangements in exchange for non-refundable upfront payments and consideration as services are performed. These arrangements include multiple elements, such as the sale of licenses and the provision of services. Under these arrangements, the Company also is entitled to receive development milestone payments and royalties in the form of a designated percentage of product sales. The Company classifies non-refundable upfront payments, milestone payments and royalties received under collaboration and licensing agreements as revenues within its statements of operations because the Company views such activities as being central to its business operations.
Revenue is recognized when all of the following conditions are met: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, (iii) fees are fixed or determinable, and (iv) collection of fees is reasonably assured. The Company’s contract research and development services revenue was recognized in the period in which the services were performed.
When entering into an arrangement, the Company first determines whether the arrangement includes multiple deliverables and is subject to accounting guidance in ASC subtopic 605-25, Multiple-Element Arrangements. If the Company determines that an arrangement includes multiple elements, it determines whether the arrangement should be divided into separate units of accounting and how the arrangement consideration should be measured and allocated among the separate units of accounting. An element qualifies as a separate unit of accounting when the delivered element has standalone value to the customer. The Company’s arrangements do not include a general right of return relative to delivered elements. Any delivered elements that do not qualify as separate units of accounting are combined with other undelivered elements within the arrangement as a single unit of accounting. If the arrangement constitutes a single combined unit of accounting, the Company determines the revenue recognition method for the combined unit of accounting and recognizes the revenue over the period from inception through the date the last deliverable within the single unit of accounting is delivered.
Non-refundable upfront license fees are recorded as deferred revenue and recognized into revenue on a straight-line basis over the estimated period of the Company’s substantive performance obligations. If the Company does not have substantive performance obligations, the Company recognizes non-refundable upfront fees into revenue through the date the deliverable is satisfied. Analyzing the arrangement to identify deliverables requires the use of judgment and each deliverable may be an obligation to deliver services, a right or license to use an asset, or another performance obligation. In arrangements that include license rights and other non-contingent deliverables, such as participation in a steering committee, these deliverables do not have standalone value because the non-contingent deliverables are dependent on the license rights. That is, the non-contingent deliverables would not have value without the license rights, and only the Company can perform the related services. Upfront license rights and non-contingent deliverables, such as participation in a steering committee, do not have standalone value as they are not sold separately and they cannot be resold. In addition, when non-contingent deliverables are sold with upfront license rights, the license rights do not represent the culmination of a separate earnings process. As such, the Company accounts for the license and the non-contingent deliverables as a single combined unit of accounting. In such instances, the license revenue in the form of non-refundable upfront payments is deferred and recognized over the applicable relationship period, which historically has been the estimated period of the Company’s substantive performance obligations or the period the rights granted are in effect. The Company recognizes contingent event-based payments under license agreements when the payments are received. The Company has not received any royalty payments to date.
The Company will recognize a milestone payment when earned if it is substantive and the Company has no ongoing performance obligations related to the milestone. A milestone payment is considered substantive if it: 1) is commensurate with either the Company’s performance to achieve the milestone or the enhanced value of the delivered item as a result of a specific outcome from the Company’s performance to achieve the milestone; 2) relates solely to past performance; and 3) is reasonable relative to all of the deliverables and payment terms, including other potential milestone consideration, within the arrangement.
Amounts received prior to satisfying all revenue recognition criteria are recorded as deferred revenue in the accompanying balance sheets.
The Company’s deferred revenue includes non-refundable upfront payments received under certain licensing and collaboration arrangements that contain substantive performance obligations that the Company is providing over respective defined service or estimated relationship periods. Such non-refundable upfront payments are recognized over these defined service or estimated relationship periods.
Collaboration Arrangements
Collaboration Arrangements
The Company assesses its contractual arrangements, and presents costs incurred and payments received under contractual arrangements, in accordance with FASB ASC 808, Collaborative Arrangements (Topic 808), when the Company determines that the contractual arrangement includes a joint operating activity, has active participation by both parties, and both parties are subject to significant risks and rewards under the arrangement. When reimbursement payments are due to the Company under a collaborative arrangement within the scope of Topic 808, the Company determines the appropriate classification for each specific reimbursement payment in the statements of operations by considering (i) the nature of the arrangement, (ii) the nature of the Company’s business operations, and (iii) the contractual terms of the arrangement.
The Company's August 2013 development, license, and supply agreement with R-Pharm, CJSC (“R-Pharm”), combined with the supplemental arrangement in November 2014, is a collaborative arrangement pursuant to Topic 808 and the Company’s previously described accounting policy. The reimbursements due from R-Pharm for specified research and development costs incurred by the Company are classified as a reduction to research and development expense in the accompanying statements of operations. The reimbursements due to the Company are recorded as a reduction of expense when (i) the reimbursable expenses have been incurred by the Company, (ii) persuasive evidence of a cost reimbursement arrangement exists, (iii) reimbursable costs are fixed or determinable, and (iv) the collection of the reimbursement payment is reasonably assured. The Company recorded receivables for unpaid reimbursement amounts due from R-Pharm of $777 and $226 as of June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively, which are presented as other current assets in the accompanying balance sheets.
Research and Development
Research and Development
Major components of research and development costs include clinical trial activities and services, including related drug formulation, manufacturing, and other development, preclinical studies, cash compensation, stock-based compensation, fees paid to consultants and other entities that conduct certain research and development activities on the Company’s behalf, materials and supplies, legal services, and regulatory compliance.
The Company is required to estimate its expenses resulting from its obligations under contracts with clinical research organizations, clinical site agreements, vendors, and consultants in connection with conducting SCY-078 clinical trials and preclinical development. The financial terms of these contracts are subject to negotiations which vary from contract to contract, and may result in payment flows that do not match the periods over which materials or services are provided to the Company under such contracts. The Company’s objective is to reflect the appropriate development and trial expenses in its financial statements by matching those expenses with the period in which the services and efforts are expended. For clinical trials, the Company accounts for these expenses according to the progress of the trial as measured by actual hours expended by CRO personnel, investigator performance or completion of specific tasks, patient progression, or timing of various aspects of the trial. For preclinical development services performed by outside service providers, the Company determines accrual estimates through financial models, taking into account development progress data received from outside service providers and discussions with applicable Company and service provider personnel.
Reimbursements of certain research and development costs by parties under collaborative arrangements have been recorded as a reduction of research and development expense presented within the statement of operations.
Effect of Recent Accounting Pronouncements
Effect of Recent Accounting Pronouncements
In April 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-08, Reporting Discontinued Operations and Disclosures of Disposals of Components of an Entity, or ASU 2014-08. Under ASU 2014-08, only disposals representing a strategic shift in operations that have a major effect on the Company’s operations and financial results should be presented as discontinued operations. Additionally, ASU 2014-08 requires expanded disclosures about discontinued operations that will provide financial statement users with more information about the assets, liabilities, income, and expenses of discontinued operations. The amendments in ASU 2014-08 are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2014. The Company adopted this guidance in the first quarter of 2015 and has applied it in the accompanying interim financial statements for presentation and disclosure of the Services Business as discontinued operations (see Note 14). The Company will also apply, as applicable, the guidance to future dispositions or classifications as held for sale.
In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers: Topic 606, or ASU 2014-09. ASU 2014-09 establishes the principles for recognizing revenue and develops a common revenue standard for U.S. GAAP. The standard outlines a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes most current revenue recognition guidance, including industry-specific guidance. In applying the new revenue recognition model to contracts with customers, an entity: (1) identifies the contract(s) with a customer; (2) identifies the performance obligations in the contract(s); (3) determines the transaction price; (4) allocates the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract(s); and (5) recognizes revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation. The accounting standards update applies to all contracts with customers except those that are within the scope of other topics in the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. The accounting standards update also requires significantly expanded quantitative and qualitative disclosures regarding the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. This guidance is effective for fiscal years and interim periods within those years beginning after December 15, 2016, which is effective for the Company for the year ending December 31, 2017. The FASB delayed in the effective date of the accounting standards update to fiscal years and interim periods within those years beginning on or after December 15, 2017, which is pending approval. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that the implementation of ASU 2014-09 will have on the Company’s financial statements.
In August 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-15, Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern, or ASU 2014-15. ASU 2014-15 will explicitly require management to assess an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern, and to provide related footnote disclosure in certain circumstances. The new standard will be effective for all entities in the first annual period ending after December 15, 2016. Earlier adoption is permitted. The Company is not early adopting ASU 2014-15. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that the implementation of ASU 2014-15 will have on the Company’s financial statements, and the actual impact will be dependent upon the Company’s liquidity and the nature or significance of future events or conditions that exist upon adopting the updated standard.
In January 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-01, Simplifying Income Statement Presentation by Eliminating the Concept of Extraordinary Items, or ASU 2015-01. ASU 2015-01 eliminates from GAAP the concept of extraordinary items. ASU 2015-01 is effective for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted. The Company does not expect that the adoption of ASU 2015-01 will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-03, Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs, or ASU 2015-03. Under ASU 2015-03, the costs of issuing debt will no longer be recorded as an intangible asset, except when incurred before receipt of the funding from the associated debt liability. Rather, debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability will be presented on the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the debt liability, similar to the presentation of debt discounts. The costs will continue to be amortized to interest expense using the effective interest method. ASU 2015-03 is effective for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2015, with early adoption permitted. ASU 2015-03 requires retrospective application to all prior periods presented in the financial statements. The Company does not expect that the adoption of ASU 2015-03 will have a material any impact on its consolidated financial statements. 
In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-05, Customer’s Accounting for Fees Paid in a Cloud Computing Arrangement”, or ASU 2015-05ASU 2015-05 provides guidance to entities about whether a cloud computing arrangement includes a software license. Under ASU 2015-05, if a software cloud computing arrangement contains a software license, entities should account for the license element of the arrangement in a manner consistent with the acquisition of other software licenses. If the arrangement does not contain a software license, entities should account for the arrangement as a service contract. ASU 2015-05 also removes the requirement to analogize to ASC 840-10, to determine the asset acquired in a software licensing arrangement. For public companies, ASU 2015-05 is effective for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2015, and early adoption is permitted. The Company does not expect that the adoption of ASU 2015-05 will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.